Josephine.

Sep 13 2014

Why do I love Lana remixes?

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Here’s a sure-fire way to know that you hate women: when an incident of intimate partner violence in which a man knocks a woman unconscious gains national attention and every question or comment you think to make has to do with her behavior, you really hate women. Like, despise.

There is no other explanation. There is no ‘I need all the facts.’ There is no excuse. You hate women. Own it.

Now, you probably don’t believe you hate women. You probably honestly think you’re being an objective observer whose only interest is the truth. You are delusional.

We have this problem in our discourse around the most important challenges we face where we feel we have to be ‘fair to both sides.’ But sometimes, one of those sides is subjugation and oppression. If you’re OK with legitimizing that side in the interest of ‘fairness’ you’re essentially saying you’re OK with oppression as a part of the human condition. That’s some hateful shit.

— Mychal Denzel Smith | How to know that you hate women (via thepeoplesrecord)

(via monaeltahawy)

4,805 notes

Sep 09 2014
marginalutilite:

thestripperhatesyou:

nprbooks:

We’ve got an awesome (and exclusive!) first read this week: Caitlin Moran’s How to Build a Girl.
If you’ve read Moran’s 2011 memoir, How to Be a Woman, you might recognize the girl at the center of her new novel. This rollicking and rather autobiographical book follows young Johanna Morrigan, who’s growing up poor but imaginative in the depressed English city of Wolverhampton. After nervously humiliating herself while reading a prize-winning poem on live television, Johanna decides the only way out is to completely reinvent herself, to build a new girl: Dolly Wilde, hard-drinking, man-crazy music critic in a top hat and thick eyeliner.
How to Build a Girl will be published Sept. 23.

Oh boy, can’t wait for @marginalutilite's review. 

Oh how I hate racist neoliberal feminists like Moran—let me count the ways

Top hat and thick eyeliner. Top hat and thick eyeliner.

marginalutilite:

thestripperhatesyou:

nprbooks:

We’ve got an awesome (and exclusive!) first read this week: Caitlin Moran’s How to Build a Girl.

If you’ve read Moran’s 2011 memoir, How to Be a Woman, you might recognize the girl at the center of her new novel. This rollicking and rather autobiographical book follows young Johanna Morrigan, who’s growing up poor but imaginative in the depressed English city of Wolverhampton. After nervously humiliating herself while reading a prize-winning poem on live television, Johanna decides the only way out is to completely reinvent herself, to build a new girl: Dolly Wilde, hard-drinking, man-crazy music critic in a top hat and thick eyeliner.

How to Build a Girl will be published Sept. 23.

Oh boy, can’t wait for @marginalutilite's review. 

Oh how I hate racist neoliberal feminists like Moran—let me count the ways

Top hat and thick eyeliner. Top hat and thick eyeliner.

115 notes

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nprbooks:

We’ve got an awesome (and exclusive!) first read this week: Caitlin Moran’s How to Build a Girl.
If you’ve read Moran’s 2011 memoir, How to Be a Woman, you might recognize the girl at the center of her new novel. This rollicking and rather autobiographical book follows young Johanna Morrigan, who’s growing up poor but imaginative in the depressed English city of Wolverhampton. After nervously humiliating herself while reading a prize-winning poem on live television, Johanna decides the only way out is to completely reinvent herself, to build a new girl: Dolly Wilde, hard-drinking, man-crazy music critic in a top hat and thick eyeliner.
How to Build a Girl will be published Sept. 23.

Oh boy, can’t wait for @marginalutilite's review. 

nprbooks:

We’ve got an awesome (and exclusive!) first read this week: Caitlin Moran’s How to Build a Girl.

If you’ve read Moran’s 2011 memoir, How to Be a Woman, you might recognize the girl at the center of her new novel. This rollicking and rather autobiographical book follows young Johanna Morrigan, who’s growing up poor but imaginative in the depressed English city of Wolverhampton. After nervously humiliating herself while reading a prize-winning poem on live television, Johanna decides the only way out is to completely reinvent herself, to build a new girl: Dolly Wilde, hard-drinking, man-crazy music critic in a top hat and thick eyeliner.

How to Build a Girl will be published Sept. 23.

Oh boy, can’t wait for @marginalutilite's review. 

115 notes

Sep 06 2014

itsstuckyinmyhead:

American Tumblr Posts Photoset #1

Want to see more country photosets?

British Photoset #2

Canadian Photoset #3

57,324 notes

Sep 04 2014
Not all toxic people are cruel and uncaring. Some of them love us dearly. Many of them have good intentions. Most are toxic to our being simply because their needs and way of existing in the world force us to compromise ourselves and our happiness. They aren’t inherently bad people, but they aren’t the right people for us. And as hard as it is, we have to let them go. Life is hard enough without being around people who bring you down, and as much as you care, you can’t destroy yourself for the sake of someone else. You have to make your wellbeing a priority. Whether that means breaking up with someone you care about, loving a family member from a distance, letting go of a friend, or removing yourself from a situation that feels painful — you have every right to leave and create a safer space for yourself.
— Daniell Koepke (via quotationadmiration)

(via freakygeekyblerd)

1,502 notes

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Sep 03 2014
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I think one thing you can do to help your friends who are depressed is to reach out to them not in the spirit of helping, but in the spirit of liking them and wanting their company. “I’m here to help if you ever need me” is good to know, but hard to act on, especially when you’re in a dark place. Specific, ongoing, pleasure-based invitations are much easier to absorb. “I’m here. Let’s go to the movies. Or stay in and order takeout and watch some dumb TV.” “I’m having a party, it would be really great if you could come for a little while.” Ask them for help with things you know they are good at and like doing, so there is reciprocity and a way for them to contribute. “Will you come over Sunday and help me clear my closet of unfashionable and unflattering items? I trust your eye.” “Will you read this story I wrote and help me fix the dialogue?” “Want to make dinner together? You chop, I’ll assemble.” “I am going glasses shopping and I need another set of eyes.” Remind yourself why you like this person, and in the process, remind them that they are likable and worth your time and interest.

Talk to the parts of the person that aren’t being eaten by the depression. Make it as easy as possible to make and keep plans, if you have the emotional resources to be the initiator and to meet your friends a little more than halfway. If the person turns down a bunch of invitations in a row because (presumably) they don’t have the energy to be social, respect their autonomy by giving it a month or two and then try again. Keep the invitations simple; “Any chance we could have breakfast Saturday?” > “ARE YOU AVOIDING ME BECAUSE YOU’RE DEPRESSED OR BECAUSE YOU HATE ME I AM ONLY TRYING TO HELP YOU.” “I miss you and I want to see you” > “I’m worried about you.” A depressed person is going to have a shame spiral about how their shame is making them avoid you and how that’s giving them more shame, which is making them avoid you no matter what you do. No need for you to call attention to it. Just keep asking. “I want to see you” “Let’s do this thing.” “If you are feeling low, I understand, and I don’t want to impose on you, but I miss your face. Please come have coffee with me.” “Apology accepted. ApologIES accepted. So. Gelato and Outlander?”

#613: How do I reach out to my friends who have depression? | Captain Awkward

P.S. A lot of people with depression and other mental illnesses have trouble making decisions or choosing from a bunch of different options. “Wanna get dinner at that pizza place on Tuesday night?” is a LOT easier to answer than “So wanna hang out sometime? What do you want to do?”

(via startrekrenegades)

(Source: brutereason, via crowcarousel)

43,109 notes

Sep 02 2014
If you think women are crazy you’ve never had a dude go from hitting on you to literally threatening to kill you in the time it takes you to say “no thanks.”
— Kendra Wells  (via napsie)

(Source: mysharona1987, via onefitmodel)

127,818 notes

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